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Thread: Front squats vs back squats for athletes

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    Member Chris6878's Avatar
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    Front squats vs back squats for athletes


  2. #2

    Re: Front squats vs back squats for athletes

    He makes a ot of good points. Like everything though, he has arguments for why front is better than back. Lets a see a counter video for back v front. Lets take into account WHY you might be choosing to do the exercise in the first place and then choose the appropriate exercise to get the desired outcome as there are many variations and routes and exercises. I wouldnt bin back squat just based on this video.
    The positive shin angle bit in relation to sprinters? Erm not sure of the relevance here in squatting and relating that to acceleration.Obviously a positive shin angle is needed in acceleration but the display of this in squatting seems less relevant than he is making out. Not see DeFrancos comments on this.
    My tuppence worth of thoughts anyway.

  3. #3
    Member Chris6878's Avatar
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    Re: Front squats vs back squats for athletes

    I did fronts during before I went into my strength phase which I then switched to back squats. I tore my quad years back so I wanted to focus on quads more.

  4. #4

    Re: Front squats vs back squats for athletes

    Hulse talks about athletes having lordosis due to over-developed quads but then recommends an exercise that emphasizes the quads? Greater hip flexibility, more ankle flexion, more upright posture, hips closer under the bar; most of the points he makes could be addressed by high-bar full squats.

    It reminds me of an old thread on the forum "front vs back squat" or something like that. I remember Charlie's response was fronts were fine but if you have to do a bunch of posterior exercises to balance things out why not just stick with more efficient back squats?

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    Member RB34's Avatar
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    Re: Front squats vs back squats for athletes

    Stay away from front squats...

  6. #6

    Re: Front squats vs back squats for athletes

    Even weighlifters will favor back squats over front squats now days. One reason being that there are less limiting factors in the back squat. I can even name a couple of weightlifting coaches who favor more posterior chain development over quad development in their weightlifters and do more way more back squats for this reason. This wasn't the case several years ago.

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    Administrator Angela Coon's Avatar
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    Re: Front squats vs back squats for athletes

    Quote Originally Posted by Stikki View Post
    Hulse talks about athletes having lordosis due to over-developed quads but then recommends an exercise that emphasizes the quads? Greater hip flexibility, more ankle flexion, more upright posture, hips closer under the bar; most of the points he makes could be addressed by high-bar full squats.

    It reminds me of an old thread on the forum "front vs back squat" or something like that. I remember Charlie's response was fronts were fine but if you have to do a bunch of posterior exercises to balance things out why not just stick with more efficient back squats?
    Rewatch the video and tell me why having stronger quads is an asset in sprinting which requires force executed from the largest muscle groups in our bodies? I didn't think the quads were the largest muscles in the body ?
    It's true that ankle flexibility is important in sprinting. How do we get maximum ankle flexibility, are we born with some of it and what are best ways to acquire it?
    Charlie commented once on Angella's eldest daughter running the 100 meters. He marveled at how her ankle moved over the ground in the same way Angella's did the first time he watched Angella run.
    The proper balance of quad strength in relation to glute and hamstring strength is essential for sprinting.
    I'm excited knowing members are quick to recall former discussions about topics others debate online.
    Thank-you guys for drawing our attention to the history here as this debate will be favored most by people looking to " complete the project of reinventing the wheel "

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    Re: Front squats vs back squats for athletes

    Quote Originally Posted by Stikki View Post
    Hulse talks about athletes having lordosis due to over-developed quads but then recommends an exercise that emphasizes the quads? Greater hip flexibility, more ankle flexion, more upright posture, hips closer under the bar; most of the points he makes could be addressed by high-bar full squats.

    It reminds me of an old thread on the forum "front vs back squat" or something like that. I remember Charlie's response was fronts were fine but if you have to do a bunch of posterior exercises to balance things out why not just stick with more efficient back squats?
    lol Keep it Simple Sprinter KISS

    CF-2007: "If you need to do front squat for whatever reason, you'd need to supplement with another back dominant lift. If you do backsquat, you don't. If you actually have the choice and you need to limit the number of lifts in a session, the choice would be obvious. That said, you have to approach things in the way you are best able"

    http://www.charliefrancis.com/commun...-VS-Back-squat

    google search whatever keywords you want to read up on...even past Hall of Fame (HOF) Members

    i.e. google: charliefrancis.com site: Front squats vs back squats

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    Member boldwarrior's Avatar
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    Re: Front squats vs back squats for athletes

    If in doubt, there is a video here called
    Training and adaption

  10. #10

    Re: Front squats vs back squats for athletes

    Front squats place less load on the knee joint. For a full PDF of the study, I have attached a link below.

    Contrary to intuition when reviewing EMG data, the back squat actually activates greater RF, VL, than the front squat.


    http://steinhardt.nyu.edu/scmsAdmin/...20Research.pdf

    Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research:
    January 2009 - Volume 23 - Issue 1 - pp 284-292
    doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e31818546bb
    Original Research
    A Biomechanical Comparison of Back and Front Squats in Healthy Trained Individuals
    Gullett, Jonathan C; Tillman, Mark D; Gutierrez, Gregory M; Chow, John W

    Abstract
    Gullett, JC, Tillman, MD, Gutierrez, GM, and Chow, JW. A biomechanical comparison of back and front squats in healthy trained individuals. J Strength Cond Res 23(1): 284-292, 2008-The strength and stability of the knee plays an integral role in athletics and activities of daily living. A better understanding of knee joint biomechanics while performing variations of the squat would be useful in rehabilitation and exercise prescription. We quantified and compared tibiofemoral joint kinetics as well as muscle activity while executing front and back squats. Because of the inherent change in the position of the center of mass of the bar between the front and back squat lifts, we hypothesized that the back squat would result in increased loads on the knee joint and that the front squat would result in increased knee extensor and decreased back extensor muscle activity. A crossover study design was used. To assess the net force and torque placed on the knee and muscle activation levels, a combination of video and force data, as well as surface electromyographic data, were collected from 15 healthy trained individuals. The back squat resulted in significantly higher compressive forces and knee extensor moments than the front squat. Shear forces at the knee were small in magnitude, posteriorly directed, and did not vary between the squat variations. Although bar position did not influence muscle activity, muscle activation during the ascending phase was significantly greater than during the descending phase. The front squat was as effective as the back squat in terms of overall muscle recruitment, with significantly less compressive forces and extensor moments. The results suggest that front squats may be advantageous compared with back squats for individuals with knee problems such as meniscus tears, and for long-term joint health

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