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Thread: CLA & PYRUVATE Vs. UDO'S OIL

  1. #1

    CLA & PYRUVATE Vs. UDO'S OIL

    I have been on a diet of 6gm of CLA and 6 gm of Calcium Pyruvate daily. Is Udo's oil equally effective as my current regimen? The purpose of this supplementation is to be more lean.


    Thoughts?

  2. #2
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    My understanding is that CLA and Pyruvate are 2 different supplements then Fish oil.
    CLA and Pyruvate aid in weight loss and fish oil is for cardiovascualr health and recovery along with hundreds of other important positive benefits but not specifically to aid in burning fat.

  3. #3
    So could one supplement CLA, Pyruvate, AND UDO's oil altogether?

  4. #4
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    yes. definatly.
    but for your goals there may be better supplements for weight loss rather than Pyruvate and CLA.

    L-Carnitine??? thoughts anyone?

    And how about diet. # of calories taken in vs. those being burned. How many meals per day? Protein consumption?

    Those are all factors much more important than supplements when trying to lean out a bit.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by nigerian nightmare
    I have been on a diet of 6gm of CLA and 6 gm of Calcium Pyruvate daily. Is Udo's oil equally effective as my current regimen? The purpose of this supplementation is to be more lean.


    Thoughts?
    CLA and pyryvate are more or less useless, I think Udo's oil is overpriced.

    take preformed fish oils, 6-9X1 g capsules per day (the rest of your fat can come from a mix of monounsaturated fats with some saturates). Those have clinicially demonstrated beneficial effects on overall bodycomposition.

    Lyle

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by QUIKAZHELL
    yes. definatly.
    but for your goals there may be better supplements for weight loss rather than Pyruvate and CLA.

    L-Carnitine??? thoughts anyone?
    At high daily doses (expensive), it may have a very small effect. I don't consider it very cost effective as far as supplements go.

    And how about diet. # of calories taken in vs. those being burned. How many meals per day? Protein consumption?

    Those are all factors much more important than supplements when trying to lean out a bit.
    Very true.

    A good rough starting place for caloric intake is 10-20% below maintenance intake levels (the calorie level that keeps your weight constant), stay there for several weeks and see what happens to your actual body composition and make adjustments. Alternately, you can use a *rough* guidline of 10-12 cal/lb current weight as a starting point (this will be too low for individuals who are very active).

    A lean athlete may only be able to lose 1 lb fat/week (maybe 1.5 lbs/week if they are lucky) and it's usually best to take it slow to avoid compromising training intensity and performance. fatter individuals can generally lose fat more quickly. There are times when crash dieting is warranted, of course but I'd rather see an athlete lean out gradually over time (meaning: start your diet early relative to your competition phase).

    The research demonstartes that meal frequency, within the context of the same number of calories/day, makes little difference at least from the standpoint of body composition changes. I wouldn't do any less than 3 meals/day however. Meal frequency can affect hunger and energy levels and that becomes an issue as well.

    Protein intake should be set at bodybuilder levels, IMO, 1-1.5 g/lb lean body mass. Antyhing less and the potential for muscle loss becomes high. Meaning that the caloric reduction should come from either carbs or fats or a combination of both.

    Lyle

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by QUIKAZHELL
    yes. definatly.
    but for your goals there may be better supplements for weight loss rather than Pyruvate and CLA.

    L-Carnitine??? thoughts anyone?

    And how about diet. # of calories taken in vs. those being burned. How many meals per day? Protein consumption?

    Those are all factors much more important than supplements when trying to lean out a bit.

    I've tried both CLA and L-Carnitine as supps for fat loss.
    I was deeply dissapointed with CLA after all the supposed benefits on rat trialls.
    L-carnitine is necessary for fat loss, but unless your diet is restrictive etc. I think you'd be ebtter stiocking to the basics of energy in vs cals. in.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by no23
    I've tried both CLA and L-Carnitine as supps for fat loss.
    I was deeply dissapointed with CLA after all the supposed benefits on rat trialls.
    L-carnitine is necessary for fat loss, but unless your diet is restrictive etc. I think you'd be ebtter stiocking to the basics of energy in vs cals. in.
    Just a FYI but rats/mice appear to respond to CLA about 7X as well as humans, a higher metabolic rate and other factors contribute. So to get the same effects would (theoretically anyhow) require either 7X the dose or 7X the length of time. Except for reducing visceral fat (which should be a non-issue in relatively lean athletes), CLA simply isn't cost effective. If you can afford to take high doses over very extended periods it might have, at best, a small effect.

    Lyle

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