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Ange's Blog

Training Tuesdays

As a kid I liked sprinting, as it was a fun game at school with your friends to see who could run the fastest in the playground.

 

When I started winning races and competitions I gained a great deal of confidence and it was exciting for me to see how fast I could run.

 

As I got older it was interesting to travel and go places to run and jump against different people.

 

I started this website with my late husband Coach Charlie Francis to open the door for others to learn how to train for sprinting.

 

To learn more about his life as a world-class sprinter and coach read here.

 

www.charliefrancis.com provides an open forum for membership in a community to share ideas about training, coaching and athletes interested in sprinting and speed development.

 

My hope moving forward is to feature questions, articles and or information on training for sprinting each Tuesday.

 

As always if you have any questions let us know.

 

Best,

 

Angela Coon

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Massage Mondays

Massage for your muscles will help you to run fast and  help you make the most out of your sprint training.

If you like to run fast and you have never had a massage perhaps reading this blog will help you change your mind on how it will benefit your sprinting.

In the sprint world I became a part of in the mid 1990’s, a 10 to 15 minute massage was performed multiple times in a training week. Multiple short massages was one reason I had the ability to perform routine high quality speed work week after week with few injuries over my entire sprinting career. 

Massage for sprinting was not about luxury or about relaxing to music while a therapist performs a massage.  Massage for sprinting was about performance to run fast. 

Massage for sprinting is about performing a little bit of muscle work at a time, before, during and or after a training session. The hamstrings are perhaps the most critical area of the body for a sprinter. The hamstrings need to work efficiently and without error for a sprinter to routinely perform high quality runs. An athlete must sprint well once before that quality of sprinting can be replicated. Much can be gained if the hamstrings are properly prepared from appropriate massage. Much can also be lost if a sprint training programs does not include a variety of regenerative therapies performed routinely. 

          Key Guidelines of massage for sprinting

          - before competition use light, slapping type of massage

          - don't go deep into the muscles within 48 to 72 hours of competition unless the

            competition is insignificant 

          - deep massage lowers one of muscle to far for what's needed for competition 

          - use of inappropriate type of massage performed by an unskilled person can 

          undo the training effect you have accomplished during final preparation for key

          competitions. ( see more about these guidelines page 64 The Charlie Francis 

          Training System) 

Massage is important because it will speed up recovery time and improve flexibility. These attributes can benefit athletes and non athletes.  It's an exciting idea to know that small fragments of time will be gained in a race by hundredths and thousandths of seconds when appropriate massage is performed for sprinters. 

 “The malleability or tonus of the muscles determines what sort of leg speed you can put out and this of course is a key determinant of performance "The Charlie Francis Training System"

To watch a practical session of how Coach Charlie Francis applied massage for sprinting take a look here. 

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Is Upper Body Strength Important in Sprinting?

I get many questions about strength training for sprinting and it’s usually from athletes, coaches and concerned parents. Recently one such athlete asked “ I am curious as to whether gaining upper body strength would be beneficial to running faster?

In two words “ Hell Yes!”

Everyone is potentially able to improve their upper body strength but your strength gains in your upper body are not necessarily going to be 100 percent transferable in improving your speed development.

Here is the complete question from the athlete from the website.

Athlete Question:

I am curious as to whether gaining upper body strength would be beneficial to running faster?

I currently have good strength at 70kg 180kg below parallel squat & 180kg RDL. I can bench only 100kg as I don't do the exercise or really train my upper body much. Should I train my upper body a little bit more?

My Answer:

Gaining upper body strength is essential to improving your fitness, your overall strength and therefor it will directly and indirectly be beneficial to running faster.

Getting stronger in your upper body you will not guarantee improved speed. Begin to integrate bench, arm pulls, seated row, incline and decline bench. Adding pushups with in your warm up in small numbers as well as adding pushups into tempo days is another way to raise your upper body strength.

Incorporating strength training for sprinting has been an area of specialty for Coach Charlie Francis. I strongly recommend reading Speed Trap to fully understand his training methods. I also recommend purchasing the Weights for Speed Bundle. Reading this material will give you a comprehensive look at how to plan effective training for speed development. . You need to prioritize speed work, add lifts only if you are able to maintain high quality work. When it comes to sprint workouts everything possible needs to be done to put yourself in the best possible situation to run well every time you perform a sprint. Quality sprinting consistently needs to be your end goal to improve your sprinting.

Here are a few ideas you might think of when you begin the discussion on how to add a variety of upper body training and how that will help you towards sprinting faster.

 

  1. Making sprinting a priority in your training, combined with lifting weights, will supplement the high intensity demands of sprinting. ( 50% off Weights for Speed Bundle now until April 14 2016) It was a great deal at 50 percent off but you missed it and now the price has gone up. Stay tuned, a sale is coming soon. 

 

  1. Using a medicine ball in your warm up and within your training does not only add an element of strength training to your daily routine but it is also adding an exercise that helps with mobility, core strength and coordination. Use a very light medicine ball and don’t’ be hasty moving to the next weight of medicine ball.

 

  1. Adding upper body mobility exercises to your daily warm up like arm swings front and back help loosen the area around your shoulders and neck.

 

  1. Practicing Power Speed Drills within your warm up and making sure you are using your arms for each drill is an important addition into your training. How you use your arms in your drills will transfer into your running. (50 % off South Africa Practical Sessions now until April 14 2016) you missed it this time but watch for the next sale. 

 

  1. Stand in front of a mirror and watch your arm actions while using your arms as though you are running. Keep your shoulders relaxed and down while consistently maintaining a 45-degree angle at the elbow. Hands should be relaxed and practice holding hand in a fist with the thumbs up (don’t clench your fist tightly, tightness has a tendency to migrate into other areas which is not desirable for sprinting)

 

  1. Weights to add into your weight lifting routine: Bench, Arm Pulls and or seated rows, upright row, incline and decline bench, pull downs and push ups. Cleans are an advanced lift which require technical advice to make the most of this exercise.

 

  1. Practicing explosive medicine ball throws and drills allows you to both gain strength and utilize and or convert the strength you have into power for running. Examples of these throws are in GPP as well as South Africa Practical Series download.

 

  1. Running Tempo in your off days facilitates loose muscles, muscles that are more mobile and muscles that have greater circulation which makes them easier to get stronger and also easier for you to utilize strength you currently have. A great example of a tempo workout which combines upper body strength training is the:

 

PUSH UP / SIT UP WORKOUT

 

Everyone learns to dread this workout but you will love the results.

 

TRY THIS PROGRESSION FIRST.

 

If you have been routinely doing tempo such as 2(10 x 100meters) with less than 5 minutes rest between sets you will likely have little trouble doing this workout yet there is a specificity to all training so give yourself a few weeks of doing this workout 1 or 2 per week before you will start to feel great doing it.

 

I strongly suggest beginning this workout with a shorter distance such as 80 meters and using less than 10 pushups to begin (for woman) and less than 20 situps (for men). Initially men will have little trouble with the pushups and the woman will have little trouble with the situps. Obviously exceptions apply. A reasonable starting number is 4 to 6 pushups building to 10 over 2 week period. 10 to 12 sit ups building to 20 in a 2 week period. If this progression is too steep a more radical reduction is suggested. NON TRACK athletes may need more progressive progressions.

 

It's recommended that you modify warm up for tempo.  If you are stiff from speed work take more time. Cooler weather like the spring and or fall may require more time.  Use contrast baths before and or after tempo to jump start a warm up leading into tempo or speed workouts.

PUSH UP AND SIT UP WORKOUT

 

Full workout is 2 sets of 10 x 100 meters ( *tempo pace / low intensity as defined by 75 percent intensity or lower)

 

Method =

Run 100 meters and do 10 pushups

Run back 100 meter do 20 varied sit ups ( press here to see varied sit up circuit in GPP)

Repeat to 10 sets

 

Rest is less than 5 minutes for elite athlete / if it takes you more than 5 minutes begin the progression of this workout with 1 x 6 x 100 meter of push up / sit up workout. Repeat 2 to 3 x per week for 2 or 2.5 weeks before trying 10 x 100 meters.

 

Good luck.

Send me questions if you have any.

Best,

ange

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