Telltale Signs of an Elite Sprinter and making the most of your nervous system ( CNS training)

October 08, 2015 by Angela Coon

An interesting question asked by cf.com forum member;

Forum Member Question

What is an efficient nervous system, which if an athlete has, allows him/her to be naturally fast? I'm familiar with the telltale signs of short temper, the quickness of their feet and a bunch of other stuff.. but moving past those subjective tests, what are the true metrics of a powerful CNS? Read in my psychology textbook about the sodium/potassium ion pump, action potential, excitatory neurotransmitters.. are those phenomenon’s related to someone's inherent speed? And that leads to the question - how can I purposely affect/increase these measures? Will supplementing with electrolytes translate to increased firing of neurons?.....

I saw Andre de Grasse at Canadian Nationals... he's a standard IMO of what a person with a superior CNS is. He is twitchy. He couldn't stop moving. There was always some articulation of the limb going about even when he was drinking his water. He could not be still. I think it's that neural configuration plus zero aggression/excessive effort that lets him run very fast.( forum member from www.charliefrancis.com since 2013 and junior pan american team member)


Coach Ange’s Answer

According to Coaches Charlie Francis and Tudor Bompa 2 telltale signs of an elite sprinter are as forum member discusses above.

1- High level sprinters tend to be short tempered; explosive and intense… an explosive personality is an indication of an explosive nervous system.

2- The athlete who can move his or her feet at high frequency is a candidate for sprinting.

( taken from Athlete Development – Talent ID checklist The Charlie Francis Training System by Coach Charlie Francis page 10. See also “Theory and Methodology of Training The key to Athletic Performance” by Tudor Bompa Chapter 13 )


As far as true metrics of a powerful CNS go?
CNS has to be fully regenerated so that the chemical environment required for optimal transmission of nervous signals is intact. (The Charlie Francis Training System page 29 to 32)
Supplying excellent nutrition including electrolytes will optimize your physiology to both develop and enhance the nervous system you already have in place. Electrolytes work best during and post workout.
Motor pathways, characteristic of optimal technique and efficient routing of motor signals must be in place …. Appropriate training creates chemical changes. Notice “appropriate", not any training that some feel works for them, which advance the capacity to do both CNS work and muscular endurance work under conditions of correct technique, before fatigue is reached. (The Charlie Francis Training System pages 29 to 32)
Routine regeneration is important because it will be your first line attempt to take full advantage of the training. The training effect of your hard work is minimized unless you routinely ensure your personal chemistry is ready to respond to high quality work. Otherwise you are not optimizing what is already at your disposal for higher performance.
 

Regeneration is what you can get everyday independent of anything else. You don’t need to understand the inner workings of the body ( yet) beyond respecting things you know ( or suspect to be true) for sure.

For those of you following this ongoing discussion regarding making the most of the training you are already doing. This means more contrast baths for all of you.

Enjoy!

Best,

Angé

 

 

 

 

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